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This Jalopnik article (link below) raises a lot of the usual complaints about the bZ4X (Federal tax credit eligibility, styling, range vs. the competition) but the main focus of concern is on the marketing strategy.

The writer points out that Toyota is expecting to target 35-55-year-olds who make $100K+, but that its marketing push will be on the 20-35 age group through social media campaigns.

The obvious conclusion is that they seem to be pouring their marketing money at a different demographic than they expect to be buying the EV, so obviously they're about to waste a bunch of money and effort, and that's very possibly a correct assumption, but as I read the article, I couldn't stop thinking that maybe Toyota's on to something. Let me explain.

I'm old enough to remember the launch of two Toyotas that were marketed very intentionally to young people but proved more popular with a much older audience, namely the Matrix and Scion xB. Both of those cars were expected to be Toyota's options for cool, young urbanites, but instead were super popular with pragmatic older shoppers. And I totally buy the narrative there that Toyota screwed up with its plans for those cars.

But maybe the lesson they learned is that to make a small-ish brand new crossover that no one has ever heard of before popular with middle-aged buyers, you should try to convince them that it's for cool young people so that the olds buy it thinking they'll look younger than they are!

Just a theory.
 

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This Jalopnik article (link below) raises a lot of the usual complaints about the bZ4X (Federal tax credit eligibility, styling, range vs. the competition) but the main focus of concern is on the marketing strategy.

The writer points out that Toyota is expecting to target 35-55-year-olds who make $100K+, but that its marketing push will be on the 20-35 age group through social media campaigns.

The obvious conclusion is that they seem to be pouring their marketing money at a different demographic than they expect to be buying the EV, so obviously they're about to waste a bunch of money and effort, and that's very possibly a correct assumption, but as I read the article, I couldn't stop thinking that maybe Toyota's on to something. Let me explain.

I'm old enough to remember the launch of two Toyotas that were marketed very intentionally to young people but proved more popular with a much older audience, namely the Matrix and Scion xB. Both of those cars were expected to be Toyota's options for cool, young urbanites, but instead were super popular with pragmatic older shoppers. And I totally buy the narrative there that Toyota screwed up with its plans for those cars.

But maybe the lesson they learned is that to make a small-ish brand new crossover that no one has ever heard of before popular with middle-aged buyers, you should try to convince them that it's for cool young people so that the olds buy it thinking they'll look younger than they are!

Just a theory.

This is funny, but probably true! Also, by marketing to the younger generation via Social Media, it will go out to the masses, kids talk about it, then Ma and Pa talk about it and then Grandma's driving it :). But serious though, Social media will and in fact is spreading the news.

And technically Toyota doesn't need much help with this one, they've hyped it up enough themselves and Supply and Demand are at work here.
 
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