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With reports of the bZ4X's real-world range dropping to half of what we were told the official range estimates would be, share your numbers here to see how it compares.

It will be interesting to see where real-world range averages around along with the lowest and highest among our group. I have a feeling that we won't be far off from the reports, but I could be wrong.
 

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Edmunds did a test in June with the bZ4X and were able to get 227 miles of range on their trip.


After a full day of driving at an average temperature of 65 degrees, which is pretty mild weather, the single-motor bZ4X Limited FWD only managed to go 227 miles. This falls short of its EPA range estimate by 15 miles or 6.2%, which is rare for this class of EVs. The only other non-luxury EV to fall short in our testing was the Tesla Model 3 Standard Range Plus.

So how much did those 227 miles cost?
While the total range of a vehicle continues to dominate the EV conversation, energy consumption is an important factor as well. Energy consumption is what determines how much your miles will cost you. The unit of measurement for consumption, the kilowatt-hour, can be thought of as the EV equivalent of a gallon of gasoline. Just like gas, the price of electricity varies depending on where you live. For example, you'll pay about 10 cents per kWh in North Dakota as of this writing, whereas in Hawaii it'll run you about 40 cents.

So, what can Toyota owners expect to pay at "the pump"? After charging its battery pack back to full, we calculated an Edmunds consumption rate of 28.5 kWh/100 miles. Compared to its EPA consumption estimate of 26 kWh/100 miles, our bZ4X was less efficient by 9.6%. It's worth noting that the bZ4X's maximum Level 2 charging rate is 6.6 kW, which is slower than competitors like the Ford Mustang Mach-E and Volkswagen ID.4, both of which support charging at rates up to 11 kW. If we lived in Hawaii, our 227-mile trip in the bZ4X would have cost us $25.88, while if we lived in North Dakota, that same trip would cost just $6.47.
 

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My numbers for the first week got around 300km which is about 186 miles. I turn the heater on only when the windshield fogs up, and mostly relying on the butt warmer for the heat. One hundred percent stop and go city driving where roads have 3-4 stop lights in a mile. Temperature during the week fluctuates from -6 to 4 degrees Celsius (21-37 in Fahrenheit). Used a 100kw DC fast charger for the first time and it took 35 mins from 18% to 71% with a peak of 57kw and a low of 39kw at 71%. The temperature during charging was 3 degrees Celsius. This is the FWD version.
 

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It was fully charged when drove it out of the dealer and it had 15km odometer reading. I level 1 charged it for an additional 8 percent. I DC'ed it at 18% to 71% the other day and I came home last night it was down to 39% with the odometer reading at 344km. So more or less 300km, my math isnt that good. I am fully charging it now till tomorrow. Seems the rate is 1 percent every 30 mins (lvl 1)
 

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Thank you for the further details.

I wasn’t sure if you were saying you were only getting a total from 100% to 0% indicated of 300km or from 100% to “stopped moving”.

This isn’t even that complete of a discharge.

The state of charge doesn’t tell the full story by itself and thankfully, it wasn’t based on any range “estimates”, but a useful day to day 300km at temps near freezing seems do-able for the FWD model based upon your experience.

Glad to see you are getting some use out of your new vehicle.
 

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My numbers for the first week got around 300km which is about 186 miles. I turn the heater on only when the windshield fogs up, and mostly relying on the butt warmer for the heat. One hundred percent stop and go city driving where roads have 3-4 stop lights in a mile. Temperature during the week fluctuates from -6 to 4 degrees Celsius (21-37 in Fahrenheit). Used a 100kw DC fast charger for the first time and it took 35 mins from 18% to 71% with a peak of 57kw and a low of 39kw at 71%. The temperature during charging was 3 degrees Celsius. This is the FWD version.
Thanks for the analysis. So this is the FWD version... I thought it would get better than 300km
 

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Dutch magazine Autovisie tested the bz4x, instead of 480km wltp 4x4, they only managed 310km instead, very, very disappointing. Charching was very slow to. Overall they were not at all impressed. The Bz4x is a very average EV not on par with competition and major setback for Toyota imago wise.
 

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I am currently retesting it again from the last full charged. I have already travelled 184km ( 531km odometer reading now ) with 42 percent charged still remaining. So I would probably go way beyond the 300km range, and temperature still hovering in and out of the freezing mark. *Note I might have drove out the dealer thinking it was fully charged, but might have been not. I only paired my phone days after I got it home. Ill keep updating..
 

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I am currently retesting it again from the last full charged. I have already travelled 184km ( 531km odometer reading now ) with 42 percent charged still remaining. So I would probably go way beyond the 300km range, and temperature still hovering in and out of the freezing mark. *Note I might have drove out the dealer thinking it was fully charged, but might have been not. I only paired my phone days after I got it home. Ill keep updating..
Thanks for taking time & sharing this information. 300+ in this weather is a good range. Please keep sharing.
 

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Update.. With the odometer reading now of 608km from 347km with 16% percent battery charged and a projected distance 33km remaining. It will be just shy of 300km. All that driving from eco mode only (hmmm) and I am also barely using the heater. Current temp is -2 celsius. My travels are only 10-20km each time and 100% city drving. Today and some days this week I had to warm up the car due to frost as well.

More update.. I think toyota made the 0 km mark at 10 percent charged. See images... So I would think there would be an extra 30km or more after zero..

During charging the bz was only asking 46kw max and it slowed down at 69%. At 80% it was down to 21kw and it took 61 mins from 13% to 80%. The temp was -1 celsius. I was using a faster charger at first (27 cents a min), but I moved it down to the 50kw charger at 21 cents per min.

I also think to just use the normal driving mode. Using eco, you need to press down the pedal more which in turn using more energy.


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When I got my vehicle (Limited AWD) in November, with temps in the 50s and 60s, I was getting 190-200 miles out of a full charge. When the temp dropped into the 30s, I was only getting 160-170 miles. Last week, with temps in the teens, I got less than 140 miles. Charging time has also been very slow on both Level 2 and Level 3 chargers. I have been plugged in at home on my Level 2 for just over an hour and a half and went from 24% to 33% (6 kWh added - about 15 miles of driving). With the electricity price in CT going from 24 cents per kWh to 36 cents per kWh on Jan 1st, it will be much more expensive to drive than a gas powered hybrid. It is great looking, very comfortable and I love driving it, but it has been a disappointment so far.
 

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When I got my vehicle (Limited AWD) in November, with temps in the 50s and 60s, I was getting 190-200 miles out of a full charge. When the temp dropped into the 30s, I was only getting 160-170 miles. Last week, with temps in the teens, I got less than 140 miles. Charging time has also been very slow on both Level 2 and Level 3 chargers. I have been plugged in at home on my Level 2 for just over an hour and a half and went from 24% to 33% (6 kWh added - about 15 miles of driving). With the electricity price in CT going from 24 cents per kWh to 36 cents per kWh on Jan 1st, it will be much more expensive to drive than a gas powered hybrid. It is great looking, very comfortable and I love driving it, but it has been a disappointment so far.
Welcome to the forum @tjpoloski! At home do you charge during off-peak hours? That might be a way for you to save some money. Are you considering a switch to a hybrid?
 

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When I got my vehicle (Limited AWD) in November, with temps in the 50s and 60s, I was getting 190-200 miles out of a full charge. When the temp dropped into the 30s, I was only getting 160-170 miles. Last week, with temps in the teens, I got less than 140 miles. Charging time has also been very slow on both Level 2 and Level 3 chargers. I have been plugged in at home on my Level 2 for just over an hour and a half and went from 24% to 33% (6 kWh added - about 15 miles of driving). With the electricity price in CT going from 24 cents per kWh to 36 cents per kWh on Jan 1st, it will be much more expensive to drive than a gas powered hybrid. It is great looking, very comfortable and I love driving it, but it has been a disappointment so far.

Your range is certainly troubling. Is that <140miles from 100% to 0%? Mix of city and highway driving..?

My utility company has an "EV" rate plan that will reduce the kWh price by roughly 20% if charging during non-peak hours; perhaps yours does as well? 36 cents per kWh sounds absolutely extreme! Those are Hawaii prices! With your 140 miles of range, $0.36/kWh electric costs, and relative to current gasoline prices, my back of the napkin math tells me that that would be akin getting like 18 mpg in a gas car as far as cost is concerned.

Can you also elaborate in regards to your charging speeds? What is your experience with DC fast charging? Are you approaching the 100 kWh charging rate that the vehicle is supposedly capable of? This is already a less than ideal number as it is (as compared with its competitors), but as long as it really is capable of that speed, it should be sufficient for folks who don't need to fast charge regularly. If it's not even approaching that speed, however, this would be bad. Was the charging speed for you also bad back in November, before the temperatures really dropped?

If I recall correctly, the official specs indicated that one should be able to charge the AWD model to 80% in about 35 minutes...and the math on that works out if the vehicle indeed charges at 100 kWh and has a ~72 kWh battery. I'm almost certain that I had seen the 35 minute figure in the original BZ4X literature at some point, but now I cannot seem to find it online—does anyone have a download of the original BZ4X brochures, etc.? I know that in the fine print it had advised that charging time would increase at temperatures below freezing.

The only official DC charging time spec that I can find now is the estimate for the FWD version with 150 kW charging rate—23 minutes, 0-80%. Unless there's something critical that Toyota's not telling us about the AWD model's battery, if the FWD model can charge in 23 minutes at 150 kWh, then the AWD's 100 kWh charging should indeed be capable of a 35 minute charge.

With the battery pre-heated, is yours even approaching the 35 minute figure..?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
When I got my vehicle (Limited AWD) in November, with temps in the 50s and 60s, I was getting 190-200 miles out of a full charge. When the temp dropped into the 30s, I was only getting 160-170 miles. Last week, with temps in the teens, I got less than 140 miles. Charging time has also been very slow on both Level 2 and Level 3 chargers. I have been plugged in at home on my Level 2 for just over an hour and a half and went from 24% to 33% (6 kWh added - about 15 miles of driving). With the electricity price in CT going from 24 cents per kWh to 36 cents per kWh on Jan 1st, it will be much more expensive to drive than a gas powered hybrid. It is great looking, very comfortable and I love driving it, but it has been a disappointment so far.
How likely are you to trade it in for something else? Have you tested any other EVs or hybrids?
 

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Your range is certainly troubling. Is that <140miles from 100% to 0%? Mix of city and highway driving..?

My utility company has an "EV" rate plan that will reduce the kWh price by roughly 20% if charging during non-peak hours; perhaps yours does as well? 36 cents per kWh sounds absolutely extreme! Those are Hawaii prices! With your 140 miles of range, $0.36/kWh electric costs, and relative to current gasoline prices, my back of the napkin math tells me that that would be akin getting like 18 mpg in a gas car as far as cost is concerned.

Can you also elaborate in regards to your charging speeds? What is your experience with DC fast charging? Are you approaching the 100 kWh charging rate that the vehicle is supposedly capable of? This is already a less than ideal number as it is (as compared with its competitors), but as long as it really is capable of that speed, it should be sufficient for folks who don't need to fast charge regularly. If it's not even approaching that speed, however, this would be bad. Was the charging speed for you also bad back in November, before the temperatures really dropped?

If I recall correctly, the official specs indicated that one should be able to charge the AWD model to 80% in about 35 minutes...and the math on that works out if the vehicle indeed charges at 100 kWh and has a ~72 kWh battery. I'm almost certain that I had seen the 35 minute figure in the original BZ4X literature at some point, but now I cannot seem to find it online—does anyone have a download of the original BZ4X brochures, etc.? I know that in the fine print it had advised that charging time would increase at temperatures below freezing.

The only official DC charging time spec that I can find now is the estimate for the FWD version with 150 kW charging rate—23 minutes, 0-80%. Unless there's something critical that Toyota's not telling us about the AWD model's battery, if the FWD model can charge in 23 minutes at 150 kWh, then the AWD's 100 kWh charging should indeed be capable of a 35 minute charge.

With the battery pre-heated, is yours even approaching the 35 minute figure..?
Temps back up to 50 today and was on pace to get 180+ miles. CT electric rates go from 12 cents to 24 cents per kWh on Jan 1, plus the delivery charge is another 12 cents. I am switching providers, but that will only reduce the charge from 24 to 16.5. I charge overnight, but because of the slow charging speed I must plug it in as soon as I get home if I want it to be full by morning. I drive an average of 700 miles a week, most days around 100-150 miles, occasionally 200. I was counting on the miles they promised.

These are the figures when I tried DC charging:

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At this rate, I would have charged less than 25% in 30 minutes. I tried DC charging one other time and it was even slower (I was at 70% charge and wanted to see how quickly I could "top off".)
 
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